Writing Changes Things

As writers, our stories, whether fiction or true, causes readers to feel emotions, form opinions, and become informed.

Since the latest political shift in our American society, people are taking a stand in unprecedented numbers.

Whether for or against our cultural changes, this latest wake makes it difficult to remain neutral.

Take for example, in January 2017, our Capitol’s front steps saw the largest political demonstration in fifty years; a plea for human rights and equality. Our country hadn’t had such a large turnout since the days of the Vietnam War protest, back in the days I was born.

As writers, we hold the power to influence and persuade our families, communities, and lawmakers as we live through this turbulent time.

Eleanor Roosevelt wrote a daily column for a syndicated newspaper. Her writing ranged from women’s issues to general humanitarian causes. She was not just another First Lady. She was a changemaker. Likewise, we needn’t be just another concerned community citizen. Through our chosen venue, we too can influence others through our writing.

My passions include equal rights, advocacy for the homeless, and support groups which don’t isolate members based on individual differences. I’ve been adversely subjected to these problems in society, yet overcame them through action. Not many people can say the same, but many people are affected by these concerns.

For example, the neighborhood I work in is in the heart of a big city, saturated with homeless folks. I put this concern in writing and it is now published in the inaugural issue of One Person’s Trash Literary Journal. I am also published in a national news magazine—even without any journalist credentials.

 

Like Eleanor Roosevelt, I believe I can make a difference, and I see differences all around me, thanks to my writing.

 

Here’s how to write for a difference:

1. Which “hot topic” do you find yourself “quick-tempered” over? Start here. This is your subject.

2. How has this concern personally influenced you? Write freely, in your own space and without forethought. Then revise to convey your emotions to readers.

3. Research. Which details in your personal essay could and should be backed up with supporting facts, numbers, and statistics? What suggestions can you offer for positive change? Are there certain organizations or support groups you can recommend to your readers? Transition this information into your written story.

4. Proofread, edit, and revise, as you feel is best. Then, be cognizant that your passionate message needs to be shared with readers.

5. Learn how to get your writing noticed by familiarizing yourself with community papers, regional and national literary journals, and your local newspaper. Magazines can be hesitant with “new” writers for feature articles, however many open their running columns.

Church bulletins and the newsletter with an organization you belong to are plausible. Self-publishing through Amazon and other venues are also viable options. Think outside of the box– do what you have to—get your work into your readers’ hands.

6. Be proud. By sharing your experience and concern, your are empowering readers  to create positive changes.

How will you influence change?

What will you write about? Let me know in the comments.

 

This post has been revised and was first published on 8/27/17 at Blogging my Writing Journey, found at NovElle.blogspot.com.

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