7 Steps to a Super-Spicy Title

Today’s tip for my writer friends is how to come up with a title. Okay, I admit, this post is as much for me as for you.

Seven Steps to a Super-Spicy Title

MIND MAPPING

1. Look for key words and names.

My keywords and names are:

  • Nana
  • Secrets
  • Yikes!

 

 

 

 

And themes. My themes include:

  • Earning my nana’s praise and my place in the family lineage
  • Homelessness
  • Overcoming insurmountable life difficulties
  • Reparation
  • Repetition

 

2. Consider subtitles. Include the category or genre in the subtitle. This will help readers when randomly searching for their next book.

My categories and genres are:

  • Memoir
  • Venture
  • Wanderlust

 

3. Consider length. One-word titles are popular and catchy. On the flip side, one word and only one word can leave a reader clueless as to what it’s about.

 

4. Thinking about keywords and names, themes, subtitles, and length, make a list of possible titles.

 

This is my list. It comes from what some of you have told me and from my publishing house, along with my idea or two.

  • From Nana’s Girl to Elle: A Transformational Memoir
  • Nana’s Girl
  • One Was Never Enough: A Wanderlust Memoir
  • One Was Too Many and Two Were Not Enough: A Memoir of Secrets
  • Secrets: One Was Too Many and Two Were Not Enough

 

(Okay, I know, I broke a couple rules in coming up with that list. So, moving on–)

 

WHITTLING DOWN

 

5. Eliminate misleading titles.

 

My editor suggests not to use a title with the word “secrets”. He says this could cause my book to be miscategorized.

 

I have a problem with “Nana’s Girl”. I’m fifty years old.

 

Many of you have told me you like “Secrets: One Was Too Many and Two Were Not Enough.” Problem, being, this is an awfully long title for an e-book cover.

 

“One Was Too Many and Two Were Not Enough: A Memoir of Secrets” could be better–it has the category in the subtitle. Again, though, it is long.

 

6. Any titles left over after scratching out what could be misleading, Google these titles. If a title is already in use with popularity, eliminate it. Then, look at the title options which have made the cut. Hopefully, one of these will be a great title.

 

Nana’s Girl. An Etsy shop comes up on Google.

 

STILL STUMPED?

 

7. Let readers choose the title. Okay, my friends, as you follow my writing journey, what is your vote for my title?

 

And if you’ve written a story or poem, what worked for you to name it?

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WIP (Work in Progress) April Update

First round of editing is finished.

With my editor, we tackled these issues:

  • Scene development. Welcome to my world, my reader-friends.
  • Parting with poetic language. Readers, what’s your take-away?
  • And showing the progression from chaos to a new way of thinking or a new set of actions.

Persistence — Power — Positive Attitude, a January post put forth what I was up against. My editor’s guidance in this editing process has been invaluable in my persistence. It has given me confidence. (Thanks, Brad!)

 

Going in to April, the copy editor with my publishing house is now working with me. This is the fine combing through word after word and phrase after phrase, while paying attention to comma and period placement, and so on and so forth. Yes, tedious. I don’t envy her job. (Thanks, Emily!)

 

Following copy editing, there are more steps ahead of us. I’m not going to future trip. Rather, I’m happy to say we are getting my book ready for you. A well-known quote by Aristotle goes like this: “There is only one way to avoid criticism: do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing.”

 

Aristotle was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist. Today, I am somebody. I did something to become who I am today. Criticism fell, and I pushed forward. Had I sat still, my life would have stayed in chaos and this book would not be happening.

 

Why I wrote my story:  People told me to get my story out in any way I could. That got me started. When recalling memories to put on paper, I couldn’t forget that when life was incredibly difficult for me, people said, “Keep the faith” or “It will be okay.” Read more, here.

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Brave to Share, Brave to Change Things

Recently I participated in a spoken event to help raise awareness, energy, and financial support in the fight against gender-based violence. Each person who stood at the microphone and podium shared their personal story with our audience. Our expressions in poetry and prose emitted daring honesty to reveal a time we had been powerless yet are now brave and confident.

Heartfelt words of encouragement from others gave me a level of pride, that yes, each of us can make a positive difference in our communities.

My personal experience with this issue comes from a dark point in my journey. As explored in my debut book, coming out soon, choices, and then consequences of those choices push me to the brink of changing my life for the better. Just when I thought I had it figured out, I’m faced with one more hurdle. When at this spoken event, I described this hurdle in my spoken prose.

An excerpt from “Living on a Fork in the Road”

I had no idea how to define [him] but had nodded anyway to their comment. I’d gotten my college degree in June [2010], then in April, still without a career job, I left Seattle with him. I had no family to help. We’ve traveled from Seattle down to San Francisco, east into Arizona and Utah, and west again, through Nevada. Six months out from Seattle, my goal now is to survive.

One woman at that campground had told me, “My husband and I can take you to a women’s shelter.”

Homeless shelters don’t keep people forever. That’s why I went with [him]— I believed it would lead to something permanent, unlike temporary solutions from agencies. He jumps another pothole, then swings his right arm towards me. I’m afraid in his reaction, but then he stops mid-air, damn-near hitting my face. “Ellie, why did you let me break the trailer door? Why?”

We bounce deep into a graveled stretch of road as he grabs his steering wheel for control.  I hadn’t noticed leaving pavement. Cacti and pine trees keep the world out. I can’t rule out he can pull over and kill me. He’s strong enough. And mad enough.

Dust kicks up. I grab my door handle for leverage, not that we’d crash into another car.  There aren’t any other cars [on our road].

He demands, “Stop that. Now, look—you’re upsetting Manny.” (Manny was his dog, at twenty pounds of white matted fur).

He swings his right arm again, this time pushing me deeper into my seat. He corrects his driving one-handedly, screeches to a stop, turns the ignition off and pockets his keys. “I hate you, Ellie…. I (expletive word redacted) hate you, Ellie.”

What difficulty has personally touched you? How can you share your story with others? What will you do to create positive change in our community? Please share in the comments.

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Helping Senior Citizens, Volunteering

Recently, I helped put together Senior Boxes, working at the warehouse for the Freestore Foodbank, here in Cincinnati. We filled several hundred boxes with essential food items. These boxes will be given to the elderly in our community.

Retirement, loss of a spouse, and increasing health care expenses can make a senior citizen vulnerable to financial struggles. These Senior Boxes help ease their difficulties by ensuring they have food to make their meals.

There is an abundance of ways we can help the older folks in our communities. Here are a few ways:

Visit someone who resides in an assisted living facility or a retirement home.

Bring along a board game or cards, a book to share, a home-baked treat, or a care package.

Or, if someone you know is elderly and lives in their own home, give them a call to see if you can stop by for a visit. Offer to fix little things around the home. If it’s winter time, shovel snow from their driveway.

In our busy schedules, even a quick hello can brighten their day.

Help those who can no longer drive. Take them to their appointments and help them run errands. You can even bring your briefcase or laptop and then wait for them in the lobby while they see their doctor. You can also bring them along as you run your own errands, so they can get out of the house and visit with you at the same time.

Rich life experiences determine our character, values, and sense of peace. Imagine the many cherished stories, lessons and experiences our elders can give us.

We can make a difference in their lives.                                                                   Sharing is quality time together.

xxx

 

If you’re like me, without a parent or grandparent of your own who needs some extra caring for, there are plenty of seniors out there who could use some company!

xxx

Several organizations help match volunteers to senior citizens. If in the greater Cincinnati area, you can volunteer as I did, by reaching out to the Freestore Food Bank. Another great place to get involved is through the AARP Foundation, found in many cities.

How about you? Has your life been touched by helping a senior citizen in your community? Share your experience with us by using the comment box. -Elle-

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Women are Changemakers: My thoughts on the Women’s March, Jan. 20, 2018

March 3, 1913, one day before the inauguration of Woodrow Wilson, was the dawn of a new movement for women. On that day, more than 5,000 women descended on Washington D.C. to fight for legal rights for all women. Following activism spurred by this demonstration, it was seven years later, in 1920, that Congress passed the 19th Amendment, extending voting rights to women, nationwide.

xxIn 1913, my maternal great-grandmother was a little girl with choices to make in growing up to become a woman. By 1920, she was 16 years old, and likely saw opportunities unheard of in generations before her. She went on to become active in any community she lived, and then influenced my childhood.

Managing a transitional home for unwed pregnant women, writing an advice column for women, and owning a business were among her contributions. She instilled self-confidence, perseverance, and rightful thinking in me, thanks to the women who influenced her.

In 1970, my great-grandmother was in her sixties and a successful entrepreneur, when one of the more noteworthy rallies took place. It was the Women’s Strike for Equality, where an estimated 50,000 women marched in New York.

January 20, 2018 saw another large turn-out in fighting for women’s rights. My great-grandmother has since passed away. Her birthday had been on January 20.

Many cities nationwide participated in marches yesterday. In Cincinnati, more than 10,000 people marched. Different from the marches of 100 years ago, men too are coming out in droves to support this fight. 

xxx

Yesterday, those who marched and those who supported marches did so for a variety of reasons.

Some are fed up with sexual misconduct. Some were hoping to create an enduring political movement that will elect more women to government office, and some want to encourage voter participation. No matter what our reasons are, it all means one thing: we demand equality.

If my great-grandmother were still alive, she’d be outspokenly angered by our current American politics, and so very proud of those who are fighting to make a change, to ensure women are treated respectfully, fairly, and with equality.

With a belated wish, Happy Birthday to Nana, my maternal great-grandmother, Marie (Conner) Schmidt, nee Gosney. -Elle-

xxx 

 

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Persistence — Power — Positive Attitude…. (New Year’s WIP Update)

WIP (Work in Progress) Update

I’m starting this first month in the new year with my publisher. We’re working together in my latest manuscript revision. I’m assured I have a story to tell. My goal is to tell it well.

GOALS:

Scene

Scene development is key. I must bring readers into three scenes (on average per chapter), showing my perceptions, motivations, and feelings. How I’m doing this: outlining (again) to decide which plot points to keep and which to let fade. Infusing these points, I’m also letting go of any ramblings which follow.

Clarity

Poetic, and sometimes archaic language, tends to weasel its way into my unfolding story. (“Thanks, Nana”, I say in response to this.) To fix this, I’m replacing certain words with short punch lines to instill opportunity for my readers to have their own “ah-hah” moments.

xxx

Understanding Action

My publisher brought forth a few questions, “Why?” or “Didn’t this happen because of this?” There, I need to clue the reader in. This can be challenging. As a true story, the “why’s and “why not’s” can seem illogical. My homework is to show how chaos evolved into a new way of thinking or a new set of actions.

WHAT I’M DISCOVERING:

Purging unnecessary crap leaves room to fall in love with the must-have and must-keep scenes.

Persistence gives me an incredible high, nearly indescribable. Words of wisdom from my late nana are showing their true face as I work toward my goals.

Power. My story is about choices and consequences and what these make of us. Overcoming obstacles are a part of my story. Describing through rich scenes show how I overcame, and like my late Nana had influenced me, my story is influential.

Positive Attitude. At times, I can allow myself to feel daunted by the current problems in our American society and other world-wide injustices. Yet, by sharing my voice, my concerns, and my answers, I know change is possible.

WHY?

I have a story to tell. You may, too. If you feel your story in your heart and bones itching to get out into the world, check out this recent past blog post: Writing Changes Things. Writing experience not required.

Join me in this journey. What are your thoughts in overcoming challenges? How are you influenced by others’ experiences? And how do you—or can you—influence others?

Please let me know in the comments.xxx

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Writing Changes Things

As writers, our stories, whether fiction or true, causes readers to feel emotions, form opinions, and become informed.

Since the latest political shift in our American society, people are taking a stand in unprecedented numbers.

Whether for or against our cultural changes, this latest wake makes it difficult to remain neutral.

Take for example, in January 2017, our Capitol’s front steps saw the largest political demonstration in fifty years; a plea for human rights and equality. Our country hadn’t had such a large turnout since the days of the Vietnam War protest, back in the days I was born.

As writers, we hold the power to influence and persuade our families, communities, and lawmakers as we live through this turbulent time.

Eleanor Roosevelt wrote a daily column for a syndicated newspaper. Her writing ranged from women’s issues to general humanitarian causes. She was not just another First Lady. She was a changemaker. Likewise, we needn’t be just another concerned community citizen. Through our chosen venue, we too can influence others through our writing.

My passions include equal rights, advocacy for the homeless, and support groups which don’t isolate members based on individual differences. I’ve been adversely subjected to these problems in society, yet overcame them through action. Not many people can say the same, but many people are affected by these concerns.

For example, the neighborhood I work in is in the heart of a big city, saturated with homeless folks. I put this concern in writing and it is now published in the inaugural issue of One Person’s Trash Literary Journal. I am also published in a national news magazine—even without any journalist credentials.

 

Like Eleanor Roosevelt, I believe I can make a difference, and I see differences all around me, thanks to my writing.

 

Here’s how to write for a difference:

1. Which “hot topic” do you find yourself “quick-tempered” over? Start here. This is your subject.

2. How has this concern personally influenced you? Write freely, in your own space and without forethought. Then revise to convey your emotions to readers.

3. Research. Which details in your personal essay could and should be backed up with supporting facts, numbers, and statistics? What suggestions can you offer for positive change? Are there certain organizations or support groups you can recommend to your readers? Transition this information into your written story.

4. Proofread, edit, and revise, as you feel is best. Then, be cognizant that your passionate message needs to be shared with readers.

5. Learn how to get your writing noticed by familiarizing yourself with community papers, regional and national literary journals, and your local newspaper. Magazines can be hesitant with “new” writers for feature articles, however many open their running columns.

Church bulletins and the newsletter with an organization you belong to are plausible. Self-publishing through Amazon and other venues are also viable options. Think outside of the box– do what you have to—get your work into your readers’ hands.

6. Be proud. By sharing your experience and concern, your are empowering readers  to create positive changes.

How will you influence change?

What will you write about? Let me know in the comments.

 

This post has been revised and was first published on 8/27/17 at Blogging my Writing Journey, found at NovElle.blogspot.com.

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Choosing Your Publisher

My friend asks me, “You’re publishing with who?”

I tell him.

“Who?” he asks again, with a squinted wrinkle protruding from his left eye socket.

What he isn’t hearing is that there are countless publishers – than just The Top 5 for publishing our manuscript into a book.

Publishers come in all sizes and shapes. It’s our responsibility to vet these publishers before choosing who can vet us. ———-

There are plenty more publishers than Simon & Schuster, which Stephen King, Janet Evanovich, and Mary Higgins Clark are published by.

Notice I didn’t say “published with” but “published by”. This is one of many differences among the varying types of publishers.

Luckily, there is an easier way to think about this. Publishers can be divided into categories, each with “pros” and “cons.” What these pros and cons are can vary from author to author. The key is to determine which is likely the best fit for you.

Breaking it down, these are the categories:

 

COMMERCIAL PUBLISHERS

 

Traditional

Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Hatchette, and MacMillan.

This is like winning the lottery—but we hear of lottery winners nearly every day. To win the lottery, you have to first get a lottery ticket. To try your luck with these big name publishers, you have to first get an agent to represent you.

Like with other publishers, a vetting process is used by these top 5, yet based on platform and not just merit. These publishers buy exclusive rights to the author’s work with advanced royalty payments. Rights go beyond who owns the books; rights include all facets of decision making in the process to create the published work and then market it. Hence, an author is published “by” and not “with” these publishers.

Of interest, author’s royalty rates after publication are low, at an average of 9%.

Much like being patient in playing the lottery, so is the process with these publishers a lengthy one. Authors wait a year or more for their acceptance letter, then a year or more for their book publication.

Traditional Small Presses and Publishers

Hundreds (if not more) of these publishers exist, many with a broad range of genres, and some which specialize in genres.

But a few are Brandt Street Press, Ink Smith Publishing, and Melville House.

There are also subcategories to small traditional publishers, including:

Boutique Presses: Specializing in a narrow subject, commonly with expertise, and limited marketing demand.

Business-Collaborative Publishers: Here, two or more businesses work together to produce a published work. They hire a publisher, much the same as they hired their legal team or their marketing consultants. All parties work together to benefit the businesses.

Regional Publishers: Specializing in a narrow geographic interest, again often with expertise.

Textbook Presses: Focused on publications for educational institutions. Convergent Publishing is one.

University Presses: Sometimes this is the same as a small publisher, but handled by a university, making it different from a Textbook Publisher. Sometimes, these are scholarly reviewed, and sometimes marketed solely to educational institutions; sometimes not.

These small publishers work much the same as the above Top 5. Often times, but not always, an agent is a must. Again, the publisher owns the rights to the published works and the author receives royalties. Rather than years of waiting, though, an author can usually see their book published in about a year, on average.

 

HYBRID PUBLISHERS

(Also called “Indie Publishing”)

 

This is a class all on its own, and gaining momentum in only the last five years.

Built on a traditional model, from manuscript vetting to publication, makes it by definition traditional publishing. Publication rights revert to the author, which by definition classifies it as self-publishing. These two publishing criteria create an anomaly, thereby deeming it a Hybrid Publisher.

Hybrid publishers tend to cater to and favor the unknown or emerging writers. Publishers take a risk on these unknown writers, but alleviate this risk through the author’s investment—usually at a flat fee. Extras or ancillary items not required to publish the works may incur extra fees. The financial investment on the part of the author offsets the royalty rates, driving rates up from the average 9% to an average of 70%.

The time spent from querying the publisher up until publication date can vary greatly on several factors, but the turn-around time is normally quicker than with Commercial Publishers.

Essentially, it is a vested interest by both the publisher and the author. At times, an agent is involved to help the hybrid publisher and author meet. Whereas, some hybrid publishers don’t require an agent.

A few Hybrid Publishers to choose from are Boyle & Dalton, Hugo House Publishers, and She Writes Press.

 

SELF-PUBLISHING

(Also called “Indie Publishing”)

Vanity Publishers

No manuscript vetting is needed because the author is hiring the publisher rather than the publisher accepting the author.

Essentially, this is self-publishing with someone (the publisher) doing the work for the author. While a flat fee may be incurred, the expense is usually a pay per service, from editing to design to marketing, and everything else—each to-do-item comes with its own price to be added to the bill of sale.

Dog-Ear Publishing is one Vanity Publisher.

Self Publishing

In this case, you, the author is the publisher. You are in control and responsible for managing everything. There is no publisher to hire or to accept an offer from, other than yourself.

I hope this helps you build upon your knowledge. Alongside writing my manuscript, I’ve invested time, energy, and even at times money (classes, webinars) to become as informed as I possibly can. I’ve also gained friendships among writers, editors, and those in the publishing industry through this investment.

As an informed writer, I am confident in my choice of which type of publisher to enter into a relationship with. How about you? What could be your best fit out of the wealth of choices afforded us?

xxx

 

This post has been revised and was first published on 10/29/17 at Blogging my Writing Journey, found at NovElle.blogspot.com.

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Homeless People are Dying Every Day: Remembering Them and Advocating for Change

Over 500,000 people are without shelter each night, here in America. (More than a half-million!)

In memory of those who have died as a consequence of homelessness, cities across America observe National Homeless Persons Memorial Day on December 21, the day which has the shortest daylight hours.

The Greater Cincinnati Coalition for the Homeless, here in my greater Northern Kentucky community were among those who observed this event.

We met at Washington Park on this evening for a candlelight vigil and remembrance, naming each person lost.

A video recap, broken into three videos is at the end of this post. My friend, Tommy starts the Open Comments, singing his heart out. And when the camera zooms in on the last person during open comments–that’s me. So, for my heart-felt spoken thoughts on this terrible problem, see Video 3.

As for the raw and cold hard facts, here’s some awakening news:

Those of us who are securely settled in mainstream society, with an income, home, and family or other support network have it easy. We have resources to prevent problems and to fix difficulties. Whereas, those living in poverty, and especially homeless men, women, and children lack these resources.

Think about the last time you caught a miserable cold. For me, I bought cold medicine at the nearest drug store, and took sick time off from work, then snuggled into my warm house, cranking the heat a bit.

Then, my friend called me and said, “I hope you feel better, get some rest, and know I’m thinking of you.” At least I know my cold is only a cold and not something serious, because I recently had my preventive health check-up at the doctor’s office.

Think about the guy living on the cardboard box in downtown, or the family in a tent in the undeveloped land behind the mall. They have none of the privileges which I have. They are vulnerable to worsening health conditions, from a cold to the flu, infections, and contracting a contagious disease.

Substance abuse and alcoholism, mental illness, and post-traumatic stress (PTS) are additional factors, found predominately among homeless people because they lack access to resources and a support system of family or friends.

Aside from illness and disease, homeless people are at greater risk for other life threatening circumstances:

*Criminal behavior.  Some homeless people resort to theft or robbery to get what they need. This puts them at risk of the victim fighting back, resulting in injury or death.

*Rape.  Homeless people—and not only women—are vulnerable to human trafficking and sexual assault, leaving the victim physically and emotional traumatized.

*Violent crime.  Reasons abound, not limited to intolerance, aggressiveness, and cruelty, which find some homeless people attacked, stabbed, shot, or beaten up.

*Extreme weather conditions.  When without shelter, people are at a greater risk to succumb to hypothermia in overnight plummeting temperatures under a freezing snow fall. And are at risk to heat stroke and heart attacks when facing skyrocketing summer heat and humidity.

Many people die from illness, disease, injury, and violence, even though our country has resources which can save people from succumbing. Yet, to connect people to these resources involves awareness of the problem, preventive action, and community involvement.

 

*Contact nonprofit organizations in the community which raise awareness of homelessness and make a difference. Many have events and fundraisers to take part in.

 

*Volunteer where you can, from soup kitchens to shelters.

*Think of them when shopping. When you have a coupon for “buy one-get one free,” donate that freebie. When you buy your tube of toothpaste or package of socks, grab an extra one—donate these or hand it to a homeless person.

That toothpaste can help prevent tooth disease. Warm socks or gloves can make a life-or-death difference on a chilly night.

*Take a friend with you and walk the streets where homeless folks are prevalent. Talk to these people—get to know them as people—

and do what you can, whether it’s giving them a warm coat or clean dry socks, buying them a cup of coffee, letting them know where help is at, or offering to give them a ride to a free health clinic or a shelter.

Maybe, they need a bus ticket home to family—can you help? Listen to them, as each homeless person is an individual with individual needs. Offer help as they need it.

*Donate. Community organizations which help the homeless most often accept monetary gifts, food, clothing, and hygiene items.

Video Recap of vigil, held at Washington Park in Cincinnati on December 21, 2017 with the Greater Cincinnati Coalition for the Homeless. Video courtesy of and retrieved from Scott Fantozzi.xxx

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Please share in the comments of how you will help save a life. This could help us become more aware of other ways each of us can help.
xxx

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Right to be Human (Universal Bill of Rights Commemoration)

Today, December 10, is the 70thAnniversary
of our Universal Bill of Human Rights,

recognized by many countries, yet not all.

 

Resulting from a shared revulsion against the horrors of the Holocaust and other wars which came before, these rights have become the single most important statement of international ethics.

It is the moral backbone of more than two hundred human rights instruments that are now a part of our world. The result of a truly international negotiating process, this document has been a source of hope and inspiration to thousands of groups and millions of oppressed individuals.

Citizen action, humanitarian efforts to help others, and increasing our awareness are our calls to action today—  and going forward. Join in the perseverance to safeguard our human rights.

xxxx
Resources: 
Amnesty International USA Human Rights Educators’ Network
An independent, worldwide, voluntary movement that works to prevent violations by governments of people’s fundamental human rights.
Contact:
Amnesty International USA Human Rights Educators’ Network
53 West Jackson Boulevard, Suite 1162
Chicago, IL 60604
Telephone: (312) 427-2060
Fax: (312) 427-2589
Web Site: http://www.amnesty-usa.org/education
 xxx
Center for Human Rights Education
Economic, social and cultural rights advocacy through research and education.
Contact:
Center for Human Rights Education
P.O. Box 311020
Atlanta, GA 31131
Telephone: (404) 344-9629
Fax: (404) 346-7517
 xxx
Street Law, Inc.
Global, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that helps advance justice by empowering people with the legal and civic knowledge, skills, and confidence to bring about positive change for themselves and others.
Contact:
Street Law, Inc.
1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 870
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: 301.589.1130
Fax: 301.589.1131
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Tri-State Freethinkers
Community involved, social, academic, and activist group for those in Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana. Equal Rights activism from community to national level, with an international presence.
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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
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 1. Right to Equality
 2. Freedom from Discrimination
 3. Right to Life, Liberty, Personal Security
 4. Freedom from Slavery
 5. Freedom from Torture and Degrading Treatment
 6. Right to Recognition as a Person before the Law
 7. Right to Equality before the Law
 8. Right to Remedy by Competent Tribunal
 9. Freedom from Arbitrary Arrest and Exile
10. Right to Fair Public Hearing
11. Right to be Considered Innocent until Proven Guilty
12. Freedom from Interference with Privacy, Family, Home, and Correspondence
13. Right to Free Movement in and out of the Country
14. Right to Asylum in other Countries from Persecution
15. Right to a Nationality and the Freedom to Change It
16. Right to Marriage and Family
17. Right to Own Property
18. Freedom of Belief and Religion
19. Freedom of Opinion and Information
20. Right of Peaceful Assembly and Association
21. Right to Participate in Government and in Free Elections
22. Right to Social Security
23. Right to Desirable Work and to Join Trade Unions
24. Right to Rest and Leisure
25. Right to Adequate Living Standard
26. Right to Education
27. Right to Participate in the Cultural Life of Community
28. Right to a Social Order that Articulates this Document
29. Community Duties Essential to Free and Full Development
30. Freedom from State or Personal Interference in the above Rights
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