From Reflection to Action: Many ideas in how to honor Veterans

Examining our past and learning from it means seeing not only our achievements, but our failings. Observing our country’s current issues demands action from each of us, as we come together to make our society a better place for us and for future generations. Accountability to our communities involves not only creating a society which makes us proud, but also recognizing and then changing dark impulses which have marred or are currently marring our country.

Dear Veteran-Friends,

The dedication that you—our men and women fighting for our country—is indelible. Your fight on the front-lines and commitment to public service enables us to learn compassion and grow intellectually. Freedom isn’t free. Those who are willing to pay the price, the time away from their families, and the endless dangers of the battleground are our true heroes. Our hearts and minds are changed forever, and we are grateful for your service of yesterday and today and going forward.

Dear Friends, here are some ways to remember our Veterans:

REFLECTION

  • Read something a Veteran wrote about their experience.
  • Write in your journal how thankful you are for the service of Veterans.
  • Take a private moment to be proud of your country.
  • Observe a moment of silence with family and friends.
  • Take a moment to reflect on what it means to live in America.
  • Hang an American flag in your yard or at your apartment entryway.

    SAY THANKS
  • Write and send a letter to someone who’s currently serving in the military.
  • Thank a Veteran co-worker for their service.
  • Video chat with a Veteran who is servicing oversees.
  • Use Social Media to #THANKAVET!
    GIVE THANKS
  • Donate time or money or supplies to local Veterans Day drives.
  • Volunteer to help a Veteran’s service organization.
    ACTION
  • Shake a Veteran’s hand.
  • Teach a child what it means to be a Veteran.
  • Send an email to the people on your contact list that tells a Veteran’s story.
  • Attend a Veterans’ Day event.
  • Go to a Veterans’ Day parade.
    HONOR A VETERAN
  • Add their photo and your personal thank you to the DAV Thank A Vet Mosaic.
  • Make and share an interview video through the StoryCorps app.

 BE IN THE MOMENT WITH A VETERAN

  • Ask a Veteran about their time in the military, and really listen to the answer.
  • Visit a home-bound Veteran in their home.
  • Visit a homeless Veteran under a bridge.
  • Take a Veteran out to dinner.
  • Take dinner in to a Veteran.
  • Buy a homeless Veteran a cup of coffee.
  • Mark on your calendar a day each month to do one of the above listed—even though Veteran’s Day will have passed.

Please share with us how you have made a difference today in the life of a Veteran. Below are some resources for you.

If you like what I post, and haven’t yet subscribed to my newsletter, please do! Link here.

Resources

DAV Thank a Vet. Here, you can add a picture to their mosaic. (Link here).

DAV Website/Home Page: https://www.dav.org/

StoryCorps App (Link here).

StoryCorps Website/Home Page:  https://storycorps.org/

Operation Gratitude. Here, you can sign up to volunteer or make a donation. https://www.operationgratitude.com/

This post is in memory of my father, who I came to know and love only after he died. Dedicated poem and more are on my Dedications Page.
(Link here.)

-Elle-

 

Share this:

Women are Changemakers: My thoughts on the Women’s March, Jan. 20, 2018

March 3, 1913, one day before the inauguration of Woodrow Wilson, was the dawn of a new movement for women. On that day, more than 5,000 women descended on Washington D.C. to fight for legal rights for all women. Following activism spurred by this demonstration, it was seven years later, in 1920, that Congress passed the 19th Amendment, extending voting rights to women, nationwide.

xxIn 1913, my maternal great-grandmother was a little girl with choices to make in growing up to become a woman. By 1920, she was 16 years old, and likely saw opportunities unheard of in generations before her. She went on to become active in any community she lived, and then influenced my childhood.

Managing a transitional home for unwed pregnant women, writing an advice column for women, and owning a business were among her contributions. She instilled self-confidence, perseverance, and rightful thinking in me, thanks to the women who influenced her.

In 1970, my great-grandmother was in her sixties and a successful entrepreneur, when one of the more noteworthy rallies took place. It was the Women’s Strike for Equality, where an estimated 50,000 women marched in New York.

January 20, 2018 saw another large turn-out in fighting for women’s rights. My great-grandmother has since passed away. Her birthday had been on January 20.

Many cities nationwide participated in marches yesterday. In Cincinnati, more than 10,000 people marched. Different from the marches of 100 years ago, men too are coming out in droves to support this fight. 

xxx

Yesterday, those who marched and those who supported marches did so for a variety of reasons.

Some are fed up with sexual misconduct. Some were hoping to create an enduring political movement that will elect more women to government office, and some want to encourage voter participation. No matter what our reasons are, it all means one thing: we demand equality.

If my great-grandmother were still alive, she’d be outspokenly angered by our current American politics, and so very proud of those who are fighting to make a change, to ensure women are treated respectfully, fairly, and with equality.

With a belated wish, Happy Birthday to Nana, my maternal great-grandmother, Marie (Conner) Schmidt, nee Gosney. -Elle-

xxx 

 

Share this:

Right to be Human (Universal Bill of Rights Commemoration)

Today, December 10, is the 70thAnniversary
of our Universal Bill of Human Rights,

recognized by many countries, yet not all.

 

Resulting from a shared revulsion against the horrors of the Holocaust and other wars which came before, these rights have become the single most important statement of international ethics.

It is the moral backbone of more than two hundred human rights instruments that are now a part of our world. The result of a truly international negotiating process, this document has been a source of hope and inspiration to thousands of groups and millions of oppressed individuals.

Citizen action, humanitarian efforts to help others, and increasing our awareness are our calls to action today—  and going forward. Join in the perseverance to safeguard our human rights.

xxxx
Resources: 
Amnesty International USA Human Rights Educators’ Network
An independent, worldwide, voluntary movement that works to prevent violations by governments of people’s fundamental human rights.
Contact:
Amnesty International USA Human Rights Educators’ Network
53 West Jackson Boulevard, Suite 1162
Chicago, IL 60604
Telephone: (312) 427-2060
Fax: (312) 427-2589
Web Site: http://www.amnesty-usa.org/education
 xxx
Center for Human Rights Education
Economic, social and cultural rights advocacy through research and education.
Contact:
Center for Human Rights Education
P.O. Box 311020
Atlanta, GA 31131
Telephone: (404) 344-9629
Fax: (404) 346-7517
 xxx
Street Law, Inc.
Global, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that helps advance justice by empowering people with the legal and civic knowledge, skills, and confidence to bring about positive change for themselves and others.
Contact:
Street Law, Inc.
1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 870
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: 301.589.1130
Fax: 301.589.1131
xxx
Tri-State Freethinkers
Community involved, social, academic, and activist group for those in Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana. Equal Rights activism from community to national level, with an international presence.
 xxx
xxx
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
xxx
 1. Right to Equality
 2. Freedom from Discrimination
 3. Right to Life, Liberty, Personal Security
 4. Freedom from Slavery
 5. Freedom from Torture and Degrading Treatment
 6. Right to Recognition as a Person before the Law
 7. Right to Equality before the Law
 8. Right to Remedy by Competent Tribunal
 9. Freedom from Arbitrary Arrest and Exile
10. Right to Fair Public Hearing
11. Right to be Considered Innocent until Proven Guilty
12. Freedom from Interference with Privacy, Family, Home, and Correspondence
13. Right to Free Movement in and out of the Country
14. Right to Asylum in other Countries from Persecution
15. Right to a Nationality and the Freedom to Change It
16. Right to Marriage and Family
17. Right to Own Property
18. Freedom of Belief and Religion
19. Freedom of Opinion and Information
20. Right of Peaceful Assembly and Association
21. Right to Participate in Government and in Free Elections
22. Right to Social Security
23. Right to Desirable Work and to Join Trade Unions
24. Right to Rest and Leisure
25. Right to Adequate Living Standard
26. Right to Education
27. Right to Participate in the Cultural Life of Community
28. Right to a Social Order that Articulates this Document
29. Community Duties Essential to Free and Full Development
30. Freedom from State or Personal Interference in the above Rights
xxx
xxx 
 xxx
 

Save

Share this: